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Welcome to a series of short articles on the NHS. As a medical device distributor, we’re in the privileged position of working alongside the people who make it happen. Here’s our take on why it works so well…

The NHS is widely considered a remarkable institution, worldwide.

But do you know why exactly? In what ways is it celebrating an impossible equation? And how does it reinforce an undeniable truism?

If you’ve ever wondered how others might view the NHS, here’s our Joint Operations’ take on what makes the NHS so great at what it does…

At Joint Operations HQ, we love a good teaser so here are some NHS-related quiz questions for you:

  1. What does the NHS have in common with the U.S. Department of Defense, the People’s Liberation Army of China, Walmart, and McDonald’s?
  2. How does the NHS provide the solution to 2 + 2 = 5?
  3. In what way is it related to Formula 1?

How did you do? The answers are, in part, related to the first question above.

The NHS is one of the 5 biggest employers worldwide, and its staff – nearly 2 million of them – should take a bow. Why?

Because without their expertise, dedication and drive we would never have achieved a healthcare model that’s far greater than the sum of its parts. It’s given us an institution that’s continually striving to do what’s right and best for its patients, whatever comes its way.

Patient-centred care still underpins all that is great about the NHS: from the way each patient follows a structured and coordinated care pathway; to the way they transition from one safe pair of hands to the next – from initial consultation, to diagnosis, to their intervention or surgery, all the way to their follow-up. We see this in every UK hospital that we visit as a healthcare partner.

surgeon-pexels

There’s something else though that’s just as important to this pathway, and this is where the F1 analogy comes in. Think about car construction, pit stops and race management…

It’s the collaborative approach of everyone involved that makes the NHS one of the most respected health services in the world. Every hospital has its own F1 equivalents, working in tandem for a common cause, taking pride in their role and always striving for the best possible outcome: the surgeons, nurses, ODPs, PAMs, admin staff, and managers.

Quite simply, it’s teamwork. And it showcases everything that’s good about the NHS and is so admired from afar.

Other industries would do well to emulate this practice, and some achieve it. We all recognise it in the NHS, and we also have it here in Joint Operations. Because not only is it the recognition and morale boost of a job well done, it’s also the shared experience and fulfilment of everyone pulling together in the same direction, no matter what the circumstances or odds.

In fact, being able to say that we’ve played even a small role in the success of a patient’s treatment, as part of a much bigger effort, gives satisfaction beyond measure.

As for the undeniable truism in this article, did you work it out?

There is no ‘I’ in team. And, as far as our National Health Service is concerned, long may that continue.